STEVE STILLS

Occam’s Razor

STEVE STILLS

Occam’s Razor

To have a window uncovered and a light on is to invite attention.

It would be almost stranger not to look into a well lit room.

There’s a natural impulse to look into somewhere we know we shouldn’t.

Desire doesn’t always fix upon a desirable thing.

There’s a guilt associated with staring, it’s a kind of voyeurism.

If you look at someone and they look back, you can smile.

If you’re staring at someone and they catch your eye, you can only look away.

We might not want to feel sad, but we might want to imagine what terrible sadness feels like.

Maybe, if we could look into a room and see it, then we could avoid it.

Looking into someone’s private space, we cross the boundary between public and private and become intimate, for a moment, with a stranger.

In the darkness our fears and desires sometimes get mixed up.

Presumptions always precede the truth.

Mostly you just see a person slumped in front of the television, too tired or lethargic to close the curtains.

But very occasionally, you see things.

These photos are from a new project and the phrases are taken from a short story that was written in response by Matthew de Kersaint Giraudeau.

What is Occam’s Razor? It’s essentially the shortest route to the truth. In a situation full of ambiguity, the explanation that makes the fewest assumptions is correct.

We all like to look through windows when we walk down a street and make up stories about what could be going on inside. All of these scenes could have sinister or innocuous explanations and I’ve always been interested in photographs that ask questions of the viewer.

To have a window uncovered and a light on is to invite attention.

It would be almost stranger not to look into a well lit room.

There’s a natural impulse to look into somewhere we know we shouldn’t.

Desire doesn’t always fix upon a desirable thing.

There’s a guilt associated with staring, it’s a kind of voyeurism.

If you look at someone and they look back, you can smile.

If you’re staring at someone and they catch your eye, you can only look away.

We might not want to feel sad, but we might want to imagine what terrible sadness feels like.

Maybe, if we could look into a room and see it, then we could avoid it.

Looking into someone’s private space, we cross the boundary between public and private and become intimate, for a moment, with a stranger.

In the darkness our fears and desires sometimes get mixed up.

Presumptions always precede the truth.

Mostly you just see a person slumped in front of the television, too tired or lethargic to close the curtains.

But very occasionally, you see things.

These photos are from a new project and the phrases are taken from a short story that was written in response by Matthew de Kersaint Giraudeau.

What is Occam’s Razor? It’s essentially the shortest route to the truth. In a situation full of ambiguity, the explanation that makes the fewest assumptions is correct.

We all like to look through windows when we walk down a street and make up stories about what could be going on inside. All of these scenes could have sinister or innocuous explanations and I’ve always been interested in photographs that ask questions of the viewer.

I am incredibly grateful to the following sponsors, and to the amazing Huw Garrett for his Lighting skills.


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